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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2015 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Sensors

    Crochet/Knit Pressure Sensors

    Because of the properties of the conductive yarn to be sensitive to pressure or stretch it can be knit or crochet into any shape and will react to to pressure with a decrease in resistance. By setting a threshold in software this sensor can also be used as a switch.

    It is also possible that if you include a thick enough yarn in combination with a thinner resistive yarn, that you will achieve an “off” (no electrical contact) state. Bellow are a series of examples using both the Schoeller Nm 10/3 yarn, which on it’s own is too conductive to give a good pressure to resistance range. The Nm 50/2 is thin and can be nicely used together with other yarns and gives a very good range.
    – Nm 10/3 80% Polyurethane, 20% Inox steel fibre @ Euros 36.00/kg (3,333 metres/kg)
    – Nm 50/2 60% Polyurethane, 40% Inox steel fibre @ Euros 65.00/kg (25,000 metres/kg)
    – Nm 50/2 80% Polyurethane, 20% Inox steel fibre @ Euros 40.25/kg( 25,000 metres/kg)

    Knit in a square.

    Crocheted in a granny square (circle).

    Purely conductive yarn (Nm 10/3) does not give such a wide range of change in resistance when pressured, especially when crocheted as tightly as in the picture bellow.

    Videos coming soon…



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