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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2014 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Sensors

    Embroidered Potentiometers

    also see: crochet tilt potentiometer, fabric potentiometer, time sensing bracelet,

    Made using the zig-zag stitch on the sewing machine to sew/embroider a conductive and a resistive trace side by side. Then any conductive object can be used to bridge the contact between the traces and measure the position/distance from measuring point through the change in resistance.
    In the example video bellow a metal tea-spoon is used as a “conductive wiper finger”.

    Syuzi Pakhchyan describes this method in her book Fashioning Technology, by example of a linear slider potentiometer using a magnet to keep the conductive wiper finger in place.




    Video

    5 Comments so far

    1. [...] love the recently posted embroidered potentiometers as they show nicely how to integrate technical parts such as conductive lines which can either be [...]

    2. Conductive Thread « NerdSonic on April 20th, 2010

      [...] Check out the original article here. [...]

    3. [...] spotted these really cool potentiometers embroidered in conductive thread about a week ago. The device consists of a conductive and a resistive trace stitched into the [...]

    4. [...] spotted these really cool potentiometers embroidered in conductive thread about a week ago. The device consists of a conductive and a resistive trace stitched into the [...]

    5. Plusea on September 3rd, 2012

      [...] Embroidered Pot blog post >> Instructable (coming soon….) >> Flickr photo set >> Download Instruction [...]

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