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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2015 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Sensors

    Knit Accelerometer


    When you knit with conductive yarn, it changes the resistance when stretched. So, I thought of making an accelerometer with same principle. The weight at the end pulls and stretches the knitted structure as it gets accelerated. It works the best when this sensor (more of an object) is turned around like hammer throwing, or thrown.


    Here, I am using marbles as weights and bead to isolate the conductive thread connection from the bottom.


    Simple testing device. Connected with lilypad and xbee, powered with Lipo battery.


    Reading the sensor data from processing sketch. This is a modification of a “graph” sketch. It is showing the input difference.

    3 Comments so far

    1. Eunice on October 5th, 2011

      Very cool. Am interesting and engaging project…esp for female engineering students.

    2. […] different kinds of sensors could be found here. (some of the wireless may cost around 100 pounds for each sensor) Kai Share […]

    3. bug on March 8th, 2012

      Why does it need to be “especially” for females? The only thing it seems especially suited to is wearable electronics, but it seems like a clever a cost-effective way of building sensors for embedded projects in general. I’m male and I’m actually planning on using these ideas for my projects too. The only reason that engineers have a 90/10 gender split is because of stereotypes, ya know…

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