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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2014 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    As of July 2013 Hannah is a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Workshops

    Arduino meets Wearables Workshop

    Thursday 9th May 2013, codemotion, Berlin

    arduino meets Wearables: What can your clothing do for you?
    In this 8 hours workshop we will explore how computing can be made wearable using the Arduino lilypad and a selection of conductive materials to make textile sensors and sew electrical connections. Participants will learn to program an Arduino to read analog and digital sensor values and to interpret these values in order to control output such as light and vibration. Incoming values can also be read into other computer software such as Processing, Max or PD to trigger a whole range of events of effects. Besides learning the very basics of Arduino programming, participants will get their hands on a range of conductive and resistive materials, using these to build textiles sensors that can capture a range of physical motions and actions such as pressure, bend, stretch, squeeze and tilt.

    In order to quickly prototype interactive wearables within the workshop, we will provide a selection of open source lasercut felt designs that can readily be assembled to garments and accessories. The textiles sensors and fabric circuits can be stitched into felt and powered by battery to make final stand-alone objects. No previous experience in programming or sewing is required to participate in this workshop.

    Time and Date: Thursday 9th May 2013, 10am-6pm (8 hours)
    Location: Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft (HTW), Wilhelminenhofstraße 75A, Berlin
    Max participants: 20
    Cost per participant: 83/120 Euro
    Sign-up: through codemotion

    The workshop fee includes: 1 Lilypad, 1 USB cable, 1 Lipo Battery, 1 felt accessory kit, and a selection of conductive materials for making textile sensors.

    Participants at Work:

    Links:

    Download PDF of workshop booklet >>
    Zoe’s Openwear designs >> http://www.thingiverse.com/Openwear/designs
    GitHub code repository >> https://github.com/plusea/CODE/tree/master/WORKSHOP%20CODE/ARDUINOmeetsWEARABLES
    Arduino >> http://arduino.cc/
    Handout booklet in PDF >> ArduinoMeetsWearables.pdf
    LilyPad Arduino >> http://lilypadarduino.org/
    Volatage divider >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage_divider
    Pull-up (-down) resistor >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pull-up_resistor
    Finger Bend Sensor example project >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=4247
    Slipper Pressure Sensor example project >>

    Sensors Covered in the Workshop:

    Fabric Button >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=48

    Tilt Sensor >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=201

    Stroke Sensor >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=792

    Bend Sensor >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=20

    Knit Stretch Sensor >> http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=2108

    4 Comments so far

    1. Plusea on April 12th, 2013

      [...] 5 2013 Arduino meets Wearables workshop at codemotion in Berlin, [...]

    2. [...] Arduino Lilypad and 20 cool participants during our workshop, organized in collaboration with Kobakant! Here you can take a look at some pictures and below a  short video report made by Makerfaire Rome [...]

    3. [...] Arduino Lilypad and 20 cool participants during our workshop, organized in collaboration with Kobakant! Here you can take a look at some pictures and below a  short video report made by Makerfaire Rome [...]

    4. [...] Lilypad and 20 cool participants during our workshop, organized in collaboration with Kobakant! Here you can take a look at some pictures and below a  short video report made by Makerfaire [...]

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