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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    E-Textile Tailor Shop by KOBAKANT
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2015 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Technique

    Relief Embrodiery

    Relief embroidery on leather is traditionally used in Austria to create decorative patterns on the surface of the leather used in Lederhosen. The embroidery thread does not pass through the material, instead it is stitched back and forth, pulling together the leather and creating a “bump” (germ. “wulst”). This bump also serves a purpose of protecting the thread from wear and tear that comes from rubbing on the surface of the material. Because of this, even word-out Lederhosen retain their embroidery to a great extent.



    Video:

    Images of relief embroidery on various leather products at Leder Eisl in Salzburg, Austria:

    Process

    First pattern is translated from paper template with chalk powder, then pattern is traced with Gummi Arabikum mixed in water to keep the pattern for long enough to do the embroidery.

    …to be continued…



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