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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    E-Textile Tailor Shop by KOBAKANT
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2015 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Technique

    Constructing a Dataglove Pattern

    Many self-made datagloves I see on the Internet have been made by re-purposing existing gloves. While this is a wonderful “hack” and solution, I also wanted to add to this possibility that of tailoring your own gloves to a specific set of hands.

    The following instructions explain how to measure your hand, what measurements to take, and how to translate these into the construction of a 2D fabric pattern.

    The following pattern is intended to be made up of a 4-way stretch fabric like powermesh.

    This technique/work-flow was developed in the process of tailoring Arne’s Lazy Programming Datagloves.

    Links:

    Flickr set: https://www.flickr.com/photos/plusea/sets/72157695505447295


    Materials and Tools

    For construction:

    Marker
    Pencil
    Paper
    Measuring tape
    Geo-dreieck (ruler)

    For glove:

    Powermesh (https://www.tissufabrics.co.uk/sheer/power-mesh.html)
    Thread
    Sewing machine (hand-sewing is also possible)

    Hand-measurements for dataglove


    Step 1) Naming System

    Before we go into measuring our hands, lets agree on a naming system for the different parts we’re going to measure and need to reference.
    I base my naming system off a mix of anatomical names of the hand’s bones and joints, but simplifid so that is easier to remember and reference.

    Anatomical joint names:

    This is a nice illustration of the anatomy of our hands:

    Fingers:

    Thumb – th
    Index – in
    Middle – mi
    Ring – ri
    Little – li

    Joints:

    Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIP)
    thDIP
    inDIP
    miDIP
    riDIP
    liDIP

    Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIP Joint)
    thPIP
    inPIP
    miPIP
    riPIP
    liPIP

    Metacarpophalangeal Joint (MCP joint)
    thMCP
    inMCP
    miMCP
    riMCP
    liMCP


    Step 3) Marking

    Make a fist and with a marker, mark the highest points of all your knuckles.
    Hand-measurements for dataglove
    Hand-measurements for dataglove
    Hand-measurements for dataglove


    Step 3) Measuring

    Take the following measurements of your hand.

    The bee-line distance between your MCP joints:
    Hand-measurements for dataglove

    And mark the


    Step 4) Construction



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