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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    From 2013-2014 Mika is a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Connections

    Lasercut Fabric Breakout

    This conductive fabric breakout circuit is also an example of a plugable hard to soft connection.

    >> A bit about the Teensy
    >> Mouse in a Hole – an example project using the Teensy


    >> Download Illustrator file

    Remove paper backing from conductive fabric that you want to fuse.

    Line-up conductive fabric with base fabric. Check to see the light through the holes.

    Iron and remove excess.

    Bend over tabs and fuse in place.

    Fuse isolation patch in order to jump a trace.

    Front and back.

    Insert female headers and bend the backs in opposite directions for stability.

    Add a dot to indicate orientation. Use fabric glue to clog holes of headers so that when you add the resin it does not flow all the way into the headers, clogging them.

    Add layers of silicone and plexiglass stencils to both sides to create an area for resin to flow into.


    Use clamps to pressure together and keep in place.

    Mix a very small amount of acrylic – smoothcast 125 from smooth-on – and pour into mold.

    De-mold after about 10 minutes.

    Carefully insert Teensy to make sure none of your female headers are clogged.

    Schematic of breakout board connections.

    2 Comments so far

    1. [...] or keyboard. The folks over at How To Get What You Want took things a step further, and created a Sewable Fabric Breakout to make it easy to connect the Teensy up to a soft circuit creation. Instructions and a template [...]

    2. [...] or keyboard. The folks over at How To Get What You Want took things a step further, and created a Sewable Fabric Breakout to make it easy to connect the Teensy up to a soft circuit creation. Instructions and a template [...]

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