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    Content by Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson
    E-Textile Tailor Shop by KOBAKANT
    The following institutions have funded our research and supported our work:

    Since 2020, Hannah is guest professor of the Spiel&&Objekt Master's program at the University of Performing Arts Ernst Busch in Berlin

    From 2013-2015 Mika was a guest professor at the eLab at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee

    From July - December 2013 Hannah was a researcher at the UdK's Design Research Lab

    From 2010-2012 Mika was a guest researcher in the Smart Textiles Design Lab at The Swedish School of Textiles

    From 2009 - 2011 Hannah was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's High-Low Tech research group led by Leah Buechley


    In 2009 Hannah and Mika were both research fellows at the Distance Lab


    Between 2003 - 2009 Hannah and Mika were both students at Interface Cultures
    We support the Open Source Hardware movement. All our own designs published on this website are released under the Free Cultural Works definition
    Connections

    spaghetti monster

    the spaghetti monster is basically the idea to use 3.5mm audio sockets and cables to make 2/3/4-way connections between the gpio pins of a microcontroller board and textile/wearable sensors & actuators mounted around the body.
    specifically a first instance of this idea was designed to breakout 6 analog pins of an ESP32 Devboard to connect to textile sensors. in this first design we mounted potis on the ESP breakoutboard so that the mini aux breakoouts mounted on the sensor side are mono (2-way). but because audio cables have 3 connections it would also lend itself to mounting the pull-up/voltage dividing poti on the sensor side.

    photos >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/plusea/albums/72157719958295195

    Spaghetti Monster:

    Spaghetti Babies:

    Bill of Materials (BOM)
    3.5mm Aux Jacks:
    https://www.segor.de/#Q=KLBU3%252C5ST%252FMini1&M=1
    https://www.reichelt.de/at/en/jack-panel-socket-3-5-mm-stereo-angled-pcb-lum-1503-07-p116184.html

    PT 6-L 250K Setting potentiometer, horizontal, 6mm, 250 K-Ohm:
    we used 250K Ohm for our textile sensors, but you could also select a different value depending on the range of your sensors.
    https://www.segor.de/#Q=PT6KV-250k&M=1
    https://www.reichelt.de/at/en/setting-potentiometer-horizontal-6mm-100-k-ohm-pt-6-l-100k-p14981.html

    poti knobs PRK 6ws:
    https://www.segor.de/#Q=PRK6ws-10x&M=1

    3.5 mm Male to Male Audio Jack Cable (mono or stereo)
    spiral cables can be nice!
    search online for “patching cables”

    Older version:


    DIY spaghetti monster:

    DIY spaghetti babies:


    WORKING WITH SPAGHETTI MONSTER


    LINKS
    This page >> https://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=9137
    OSC and MQTT code examples >> http://hyperdramatik.net/mediawiki/index.php?title=Hauptseite#Kommunikation_.2F_Netzwerkommunikation
    Julian’s code examples (arduino midi, osc and vvvv) >> https://github.com/clockdiv/Spaghettimonster

    ESP32-38-PIN-DEVBOARD

    >> https://www.studiopieters.nl/esp32-pinout/

    !!! ATTENTION: the pin labeld GND on the lower left side of the board (above 5V) is actually CMD – this is a terrible mistake!


    PROGRAMMING ESP with ARDUINO IDE

    1
    Menu: Preferences —> Additional Boards Manager URLs:
    https://dl.espressif.com/dl/package_esp32_index.json

    2
    Menu: Tools —> Boards —> Boards Manager:
    search for: “ESP32”
    Install: “esp32 by Espressif Systems”

    3
    Menu: Tools —> Board: ESP32 Dev Module

    Menu: Tools —> Port: dev/cu…
    (unplug and plug to see which port appears)

    Menu: Tools —> Flash Mode: QIO

    Menu: Tools —> Flash Size: 4MB

    Menu: Tools —> Flash Frequency: 80Mhz

    Menu: Tools —> Upload Speed: 115200


    UPLOAD Arduino CODE to ESP

    1 OPEN EXAMPLE
    Menu: File —> Examples —> Basics —> “Blink”
    edit: LED_PIN = 2;
    2 UPLOAD
    —> connect an LED between GPIO pin 2 and GND (!make sure it is ground and not CMD!)
    the LED should blink on and off


    READING an ANALOG SENSOR VALUE with ESP

    1 OPEN EXAMPLE
    Menu: File —> Examples —> Communication —> “Graph”
    edit: Serial.begin(115200);
    edit: pick a GPIO pin with and ADC
    (GPIO = General Purpose In Out)
    (ADC = Analog Digital Converter)
    for example: analogRead(34);
    2 UPLOAD
    // Note: ADC2 pins cannot be used when Wi-Fi is used. So, if you’re using Wi-Fi and you’re having trouble getting the value from an ADC2 GPIO, you may consider using an ADC1 GPIO instead, that should solve your problem.


    READING multiple ANALOG SENSOR VALUES with ESP

    1 OPEN EXAMPLE
    Code example: Spaghettimonster_Serial

    // sends all 6 analog inputs over serial

    int numOfSensors = 6;

    byte analogPins[] = {
    36, 39, 34, 35, 32, 33
    };

    void setup() {
    for (int i = 0; i < numOfSensors; i++) {
    pinMode(analogPins[i], INPUT);
    }
    Serial.begin(115200);
    }

    void loop() {

    for (int i = 0; i < numOfSensors; i++) {
    Serial.print(analogRead(analogPins[i]));
    Serial.print(“\t”);
    }

    //print the following min and max sensor values
    //for graphing using the arduino plotter
    //because otherwise auto-adjust makes it hard to see
    Serial.print(0);
    Serial.print(“\t”);
    Serial.print(4095);
    Serial.println();

    delay(20); //a little bit of delay
    }

    2 UPLOAD
    3 OPEN SERIAL MONITOR
    you should see 6 analog sensor value printed in one line, plus the two values: “0” = min and “4095” = max


    SENDING DATA from ESP to COMPUTER with OSC

    1 INSTALL OSCuino LIBRARY
    Download OSCuino library from github: https://github.com/CNMAT/OSC
    Code –> Download ZIP

    Arduino Menu: Sketch –> Include Library –> Add .ZIP Library
    select .ZIP file

    2 OPEN CODE EXAMPLE
    Open code example: Spaghettimonster_OSC (https://github.com/clockdiv/Spaghettimonster/tree/main/Spaghettimonster_OSC)
    //sends all 6 analog inputs as osc messages as well as over serial

    4 UPLOAD SKETCH

    Tip: sometimes you need to press and hold the BOOT button on the ESP for 2 seconds while Arduino IDE is trying to program.

    “Hard resetting via RTS pin…” = upload was successful



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